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Updated: Nov. 24th, 2007

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In this image, a motor car is crated in preparation for stowage aboard an ocean liner. J. Kent Layton collection.

In this image, a motor car is crated in preparation for stowage aboard an ocean liner.
J. Kent Layton collection

Motor Car Ready for Loading Aboard Ship - The closed crate with automobile inside ready for the hold. J. Kent Layton collection.

Motor Car Ready for Loading Aboard Ship - The closed crate with automobile inside ready for the hold.
J. Kent Layton collection

A typical hold on a ship of Titanic’s era with the limber boards open for inspection. Author’s collection.

Typical Hold.
Author’s collection

Nos. 4 and 5 Hold Areas. Illustration by Bruce Beveridge.

   Nos. 1 and 2 Holds - The section of the Orlop Deck forward of WTB A formed the watertight top of the Fore Peak Tank as well as the bottom of the chain locker for the anchor cables. The deck space aft, between WTBs A and B, comprised the upper level of the No. 1 Hold and was used for general cargo. This hold was accessed through the No. 1 Hatch on the Forecastle Deck, with the hatchway extending through to the middle and lower hold areas on the Lower Orlop Deck and Tank Top below. Abaft WTB B was the upper level of the large No. 2 Hold, accessed through the No. 2 Hatch in the forward Well Deck. This hatchway also extended down to the lower hold at the Tank Top level, there being no Lower Orlop Deck this far aft. Cargo holds such as these with no staircases were accessed from within the ship via vertical ladders. The No. 2 Hold at the Orlop Deck level was noted on plans as being for “cargo or motor cars.” As described in the chapter on Machinery and Boiler Casings and Hatches, the hatch cover on the Orlop Deck was reinforced and sat completely flush with the deck to permit stowage on the hatch cover. . . (continued)


Image above, Nos. 4 and 5 Hold Areas - The rooms with double walls were insulated compartments, refrigerated to the specific requirements of the contents within. The dashed horizontal lines within some of these compartments represent overhead rails for meat storage.
Illustration by Bruce Beveridge


   Bunker Hold - Along the sides of the ship at the Orlop Deck level, port and starboard, were coal chute casings leading to the No. 3 Hold at the Tank Top level below. This hold, divided in the center by the watertight Fireman’s Tunnel, could be utilized either for cargo or for 1,092 tons of reserve coal, hence the name “Bunker Hold.” For the same reason, the No. 3 Hatch was referred to as the “Bunker Hatch.” A pair of vertically hinged watertight doors in WTB D gave access to the Bunker Hold from the No. 6 Boiler Room. These doors were located on either side of the vertically sliding watertight door in WTB D at the after end of the Fireman’s Tunnel, and would have been closed and secured to prevent pilfering if baggage was stowed in the hold and not coal . . . (continued)


   Tank top - The Tank Top was the lowest level of the ship, and was not a deck in the true sense of the term. It was actually the plating forming the inner bottom, and by definition was the plating forming the top of the double bottom. The Tank Top plating was fitted to the tops of the floor plates, longitudinals and center keelson, and made a nearly complete inner skin along the bottom and was carried out to the sides of the hull throughout much of the ship’s length.

   Being the top plates of the double bottom tanks, the plating of the Tank Top was watertight. This was also the plating that the boiler stools, engines, and other machinery and machinery seatings sat on. The strakes were riveted in the in-and-out fashion with the landings being joggled. The edges of the landings and butts were not planed, and the bulkhead foundation bars were joggled over the landings. The plates were increased in thickness in the engine and boiler rooms, and heavy sole plates were fitted under the reciprocating engines
. . . (continued)


Image, lower-left, Typical Hold - A typical hold on a ship of Titanic’s era with the limber boards open for inspection. Though this is not Titanic, and the ship pictured here is of considerably smaller dimensions, the deck covering and the use of wood sparring against the ship’s frames would have been the same. In the background against the athwartship bulkhead is the ladder that gave access to the hold. Author’s collection


Other topics in this chapter include:
No. 3 Hold, Mail Room and Specie Room - Boiler casings, bunkers and machinery spaces - Insulated and non-insulated store rooms for provisions - No. 6 Hold and After Peak Tank - plus Dimensions and Specifications

Copyright 2007 Beveridge, Hall, Andrews, Klistorner and Braunschweiger.

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