spacer-transparent.gif (814 bytes) spacer-transparent.gif (814 bytes)

spacer-transparent.gif (814 bytes)

spacer-transparent.gif (814 bytes) spacer-transparent.gif (814 bytes)
spacer-transparent.gif (814 bytes)

Updated: Nov. 24th, 2007

spacer-transparent.gif (814 bytes)

Sea Post Office aboard the White Star Line’s Oceanic. J. Kent Layton collection.

Sea Post Office aboard the White Star Line’s Oceanic.
J. Kent Layton collection

Artist’s Impression of Squash Racquet Court. Shipbulder / Author’s collection.

Artist’s Impression of Squash Racquet Court. Shipbulder / Author’s collection

Sea Post Office was reportedly taken aboard Titanic. Southampton Pictorial / Author’s collection.

This photograph of a Sea Post Office was reportedly taken aboard Titanic; however, this is unconfirmed.  Southampton Pictorial / Author’s collection

   Introduction - G Deck was the lowest deck on which any passengers were carried, and the lowest deck to have sidelights in the hull. G Deck was not a continuous deck fore to aft, occupying 187'-9" forward of the boiler rooms and 209 feet abaft the turbine engine casing. The intervening space, except for two flats on either side of the turbine engine casing, was taken up by the boilers, boiler uptakes, steam pipe passages and cross bunkers, as well as the engines and auxiliaries. In the forward deck space as far aft as WTB D, crew accommodations were provided along with 3rd Class accommodations . . . (continued)


   Portable 3rd Class accommodations - The port side between the baggage hold and WTB D was designated 3rd Class Section F, and consisted of cabins numbered 251 through 260, with 2, 4 or 6 berths each. This area was designated as an alternate space for cargo and for this reason was fitted with portable berths and portable bulkheads. Of White Star Line design, the bulkheads could be struck down and stowed along with the bunks if it became necessary to utilize the space for cargo instead of passengers for a particular trip . . . (continued)


   Squash Racquet Court - Directly abaft the No. 3 Hatch, along the centerline of the ship, was the main playing level of the Squash Racquet Court. This was another innovation which proved enormously popular with those disposed to athletic exercise, so much so that early during Olympic’s career it was found necessary to reduce the booking time from one hour to half an hour to allow more people to play.

   The Squash Racquet Court extended through F Deck above, giving an overall height of 16'-6" (15'-4" clear) with a length of 30 feet and a width of 20 feet. The walls and ceiling were painted in light grey, with the deck covered with Litosilo. The court was not accessible from G Deck; access was via a stairway leading down from the spectators’ gallery on F Deck above
. . . (continued)


   Post Office - Occupying the entire area to starboard of the Racquet Court between the 1st Class baggage hold and WTB D was the Post Office. Given the tens of thousands of letters that would need to be processed at sea, it was designed with efficiency in mind, containing letter cages, wooden sorting tables, bag racks and numerous sorting bins. Registered letters were held in a separate sorting area at the forward end, separated from the general Post Office area by an iron-rod grating. An electric hoist was provided to move mailbags to and from the Mail Room on the Orlop Deck below. Two sets of stairs were located at the inboard side of the room. One of these stairs was located within the room and ran directly down into the Mail Room . . . (continued)


   Insulated and non-insulated store rooms for provisions - The entire space between WTBs M and N, along with two flats extending forward of this area and flanking the turbine engine casing on either side as far forward as frame 58A, was given over to rooms for the storage of foodstuffs and provisions. The majority of these compartments were insulated and refrigerated according to the requirements of storage for the provisions therein, and were sealed with heavy doors with iron fittings. Inside, the store rooms had polished pine paneling and were partitioned with galvanized and wood staging and trays. The refrigerated compartments had slatted pipe guards to protect the brine pipes. In order that the heat within the turbine engine casing would not affect the refrigerated stores area, the bulkhead between the two was double-walled and insulated.

   The insulated and refrigerated store rooms for the ship’s Galleys and Pantries (with the exception of the la carte Restaurant) included:

    
-> A Poultry & Game Room
    
-> A Mutton Room
    
-> A Fish Room
    
-> A Vegetables Room

(continued)


Other topics in this chapter include:
Crew accommodations - 3rd Class accommodations forward - 1st Class baggage hold - Amidships area surrounding the boiler casings - Amidships area adjacent to the reciprocating engine casing - 3rd Class accommodations aft - plus Dimensions and Specifications

Copyright 2007 Beveridge, Hall, Andrews, Klistorner and Braunschweiger.

spacer-transparent.gif (814 bytes)
spacer-transparent.gif (814 bytes) spacer-transparent.gif (814 bytes)

spacer-transparent.gif (814 bytes) spacer-transparent.gif (814 bytes)