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Updated: Nov. 24th, 2007

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2nd Class Purser’s Office on Olympic. Daniel Klistorner collection.

2nd Class Purser’s Office on Olympic.
Daniel Klistorner collection

A 2nd Class alternative 1st Class stateroom on Olympic, circa 1914. Daniel Klistorner collection.

A 2nd Class alternative 1st Class stateroom on Olympic, circa 1914. The stateroom seen here is representative of E69, E73, E83 and similar aboard Titanic. Normally 2nd Class staterooms were tiled with “lino” tiles, but being alternative 1st Class staterooms, these were carpeted.
Daniel Klistorner collection

Washbasins. Courtesy Frank Braynard.

Washbasins - The crew and 3rd Class passengers were provided with washbasins very similar to these fitted aboard the U. S. Lines’ Leviathan, and were used for washing clothes. Courtesy Frank Braynard

General Arrangement of Forward Crew Accommodations. Illustration by Bruce Beveridge.

   Introduction - E Deck, or the Upper Deck, extended the full length of the ship. Structurally, on Titanic E Deck was called the “freeboard deck,” as it was the highest continuous deck to which all the watertight bulkheads rose. Eight watertight bulkheads extended further to D Deck, but seven - C, D, E, F, G, H, and J - did not. Except for the spaces occupied by the engine and boiler casings, crew messes and various service rooms, the entire deck was given over to accommodations for passengers and crew. Forward were quarters for Seamen and Trimmers, along with the forward 3rd Class latrines and a limited number of 3rd Class cabins. On the port side amidships was the working crew passageway, nicknamed “Scotland Road” by the crew and also used by 3rd Class passengers to access the companionway leading to their Dining Saloon on F Deck below. A large number of the crew had their accommodations along Scotland Road; the majority of the Stewards were berthed here . . . (continued)


Image above, General Arrangement of Forward Crew Accommodations - The general arrangement of the forward crew areas as shown here are based on the author’s research but are not known for certain. The general arrangement of many areas of Titanic as shown in this book are based on Olympic or on common shipbuilding practice. Following Olympic’s conversion to oil burning, the accommodations of the now-redundant Trimmers were eliminated entirely, while the quarters for the Greasers and the “Boiler Attendants” which replaced the
. . . (continued) Illustration by Bruce Beveridge


   3rd Class accommodations forward - The 3rd Class accommodations forward were not all contiguous. Some were situated forward of the No. 2 Hatch; two cabins were located between the Nos. 2 and 3 Hatches, and the remainder were located on either side of the transverse passageway on the port side. Some of these cabins extended for a short distance aft along Scotland Road, although the corridor accessing these cabins opened into the 3rd Class area forward. The berths farthest forward were fitted out in the manner of traditional steerage accommodations. Although these accommodations were in individual cabins, they still had only the bare amenities of true steerage berths. These men paid the cheapest rates, and their rooms consisted only of iron bunks and wall seats. There were no washbasins provided for them, nor were there any lockers or wardrobes. The bunks were generally 6 feet long or more, and a passenger would stow his bag at the foot of his bunk or use it as a pillow, as all that was provided in way of linen was the cover for the straw-filled sanitary mattress and a White Star Line blanket . . . (continued)


   Scotland Road - If one were to travel back in time and walk down Scotland Road, one would be given a behind-the-scenes look at the crew of a typical large ocean liner of the period. While the public accommodations and facilities on the upper decks of these ships are frequently described at length and illustrated through photographic images, rarely considered are the berthing and victualling arrangements for the large numbers of crew required to serve those public rooms and the passengers within them. This area of the ship, perhaps more than any other, would see crew members coming and going around the clock. Scotland Road is where the majority of the Victualling Department was berthed; this included Cooks, Stewards, Waiters, Plate Washers, Pantrymen, Storekeepers, and so on.

   The main part of Scotland Road amidships was almost entirely comprised of larger compartments with dormitory-type berthing arrangements; the 1st and 2nd Class Stateroom Stewards, Saloon Stewards and Saloon Waiters were all berthed in these rooms, and their lavatories were all located here as
. . . (continued)


   2nd Class accommodations - As noted previously, a gangway door through the hull was located at the forward end of the permanent 2nd Class section. Although designated as a 2nd Class Entrance, this was the primary boarding entrance for both 2nd and 1st Class passengers when arriving by tender, and had a large foyer inside the gangway entrance. As with the rest of the passenger gangway openings in the shell plating, a ramp was provided to assist passengers in crossing the high coaming. Leading from the entrance foyer into the interior of the ship itself was a pair of solid oak doors, fitted with iron grilles of an ornamental scrollwork design. Once through these doors, the passenger was in the main Entrance foyer with the forward 2nd Class staircase and elevator straight ahead. To one side of the staircase was mounted an oak-cased enclosure for illuminated pictures of the same type as the one in the 1st Class Gymnasium. Altogether, it gave a very favorable first impression, as the White Star Line no doubt intended . . . (continued)


Other topics in this chapter include:
Crew accommodations forward - General arrangement of Scotland Road - 1st Class staircase and elevator foyers - 1st Class accommodations - 3rd Class accommodations aft - plus Dimensions and Specifications

Copyright 2007 Beveridge, Hall, Andrews, Klistorner and Braunschweiger.

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