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Updated: Nov. 24th, 2007

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1st Class Dining Saloon on Olympic. H&W / Daniel Klistorner collection.

1st Class Dining Saloon on Olympic - The Dining Saloon looking forward along the port side. H&W / Daniel Klistorner collection

Olympic’s 1st Class pantry in 1920. Daniel Klistorner collection.

Olympic’s 1st Class pantry in 1920, looking forward on the starboard side. The two free-standing chests are hot presses.
Daniel Klistorner collection

A medical dispensary aboard the Aquitania. Engineering / Author’s collection.

A medical dispensary aboard the Aquitania. This image is provided to give the reader an idea of what a shipboard dispensary of the era looked like. Titanic’s 3rd Class Surgery, located on D Deck, contained a chest and cupboard with doors but was not as large as this.  Engineering / Author’s collection

Illustration of Sideboard. Author’s collection.

   Introduction - The Saloon Deck, or D Deck, was a continuous deck that ran the full length of the ship. At its forward end were accommodations for Firemen, and further aft, the large 3rd Class Open Space. Aft of this were 1st Class accommodations extending as far aft as the forward 1st Class Entrance. This Entrance was one of the principle boarding locations for 1st Class passengers, and opened into the large Reception Room which served not only to welcome the passengers boarding the ship, but also as a gathering place prior to taking seats in the Dining Saloon just aft.

   The 1st Class Dining Saloon, extending the full width of the ship, was the largest afloat at the time Titanic was built. Some distance further aft was the 2nd Class Dining Saloon, and between the two saloons, the combined 1st and 2nd Class Galley, flanked fore and aft by the 1st and 2nd Class Pantries, respectively. This arrangement permitted a large, single galley to serve both dining saloons
. . . (continued)


Image above, Illustration of Sideboard - There are no known pictures of the sideboards located within Titanic’s 1st Class gangway entrance foyers on D Deck, however, one could easily imagine them to be quite similar to this general shipboard example.
Author’s collection


   Peak store spaces - On all decks from D Deck on down, store spaces were located in the Fore Peak and After Peak. Utilizing the otherwise useless space at the very bow of the ship (from E Deck on down, this was forward of the collision bulkhead, or WTB A) and where the sides of the hull narrowed at its after end, these areas were perfect for storing equipment and supplies that did not need to be readily accessed. The forward store space on D Deck was fitted with 30-inch sparred shelves along the port, starboard and forward sides. Also fitted were lockers and vertical wood sparring along the inside of the frames, the latter being a common feature in store rooms and cargo holds. Access to this space was through a scuttle in the windlass space at the C Deck level, with a light wood ladder at the scuttle hatch . . . (continued)


   Crew accommodations forward - At the forward end of the deck abaft the Fore Peak store space were accommodations for 108 Firemen. The crews of the Deck Department and Engine Department (not including officers and engineering ratings) traditionally had their quarters forward at the bows of the ship, and Titanic was no exception. D Deck was the first of four decks on which berths were located for the Seamen, Firemen, Trimmers and Greasers, along with their lavatories and wash places. (Their messes were located on C Deck above, as discussed in the previous chapter.)

   On D Deck, the Firemen had their accommodations in two separate compartments port and starboard. Each had 54 berths, this number corresponding to one watch. By this arrangement, those who were off duty and/or sleeping would not be disturbed by those who were going on and coming off watch. The berthing compartments for the Firemen included standard wooden tables with benches, metal lockers, mirrors and fitted metal-framed, two-tier bunks with hair mattresses.
(continued)


   1st Class Pantry - Whereas the Galley was the area in which food was prepared, the Pantry was the area where food was placed on plates, dressed, garnished, and kept warm until picked up by the waiters. Salads and cold collations were also prepared here, and storage space was provided for china, silver, knives and glassware. The Pantry was actually comprised of two distinct areas, one in which the waiters worked, and another adjacent to the Galley where the Cooks worked. A long service counter divided the two. When entering the Pantry from the Dining Saloon, the waiters would find themselves in a culinary assembly area, designed to be congestion-free. The waiters would assemble their orders from the service counters, which were fitted with hot presses, cold lockers, and dressers. Hot luncheon and dinner soup was served in tureens from the sideboards in the Saloon; this helped to expedite the service by reducing the need to bring soup in individual servings from the Pantry . . . (continued)


   1st and 2nd Class Galley - Abaft the 1st Class Pantry, entered through double doors on either side, was the 1st and 2nd Class Galley which served the dining saloons for both classes. With its huge ranges, ovens, bain-maries, stockpots and other culinary equipment, it was designed for the preparation of food in enormous quantities and yet of the quality and variety that would be demanded by the nine hundred-plus passengers in the two dining saloons at any given meal.

   Within the main Galley along the starboard side was an insulated and refrigerated Larder, a large Scullery, and a separate Vegetable Preparation Room. Also on this side, located between the Larder and Scullery, was a coal store of 30 tons capacity; on the port side was a second coal store of 21 tons capacity and an adjoining coke store of 4 tons capacity.† Two service hoists were located within the Galley itself on the port side; one ran to the la carte Restaurant Galley on B Deck, and the other ran to the pantry adjoining the Engineers’ Mess on E Deck
. . . (continued)


Other topics in this chapter include:
3rd Class open space - 1st Class staterooms forward - Forward 1st Class entrance and staircase - 1st Class Reception Room - 1st Class Dining Saloon - 1st and 2nd Class Galley and Pantry complex - 2nd Class Pantry - 2nd Class Dining Saloon - Galley and Pantry equipment and fittings - Hospitals - 2nd Class accommodations - 3rd Class accommodations - plus Dimensions and Specifications

Copyright 2007 Beveridge, Hall, Andrews, Klistorner and Braunschweiger.

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