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Updated: Nov. 24th, 2007

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The after 2nd Class Entrance foyer and staircase as seen from the landing between B and C Decks. Daniel Klistorner collection.

The after 2nd Class Entrance foyer and staircase as seen from the landing between B and C Decks. At the lower left of the image is the piano for the C Deck Entrance foyer, and on the deck above, the windows of the B Deck Entrance deckhouse.
Daniel Klistorner collection

In this image from 1924, passengers are seen entering the 2nd Class elevator. Daniel Klistorner collection.

In this image from 1924, passengers are seen entering the 2nd Class elevator.
Daniel Klistorner collection

Outside of the Smoke Room on the enclosed port-side promenade of Olympic. Daniel Klistorner collection.

2nd Class passengers enjoy some sunlight outside of the Smoke Room on the enclosed port-side promenade of Olympic. Daniel Klistorner collection

Plan of 1st Class Reception Room. Illustration by Bruce Beveridge.

   Introduction - B Deck was the topmost strength deck and extended continuously for 555 feet amidships. Though the Forecastle and Poop Decks were at the B Deck level, they were separated by well decks approximately 52 feet in length each and hence were not considered part of the deckhouse proper, but will be addressed in this chapter.

  For the forward two-thirds of its length, except for the space taken up by the 1st Class Entrance hall and staircase, B Deck was almost entirely given over to 1st Class accommodations, including the palatial Parlour Suites. In total there were 99 1st Class bedrooms having berths for 183 passengers. Abaft the 1st Class staterooms was the Reception Room for the á la carte Restaurant, with the Restaurant itself located further aft at the end of a short passageway that led past the Restaurant Galley and Pantry. Adjoining the Restaurant on the starboard side was the novel Café Parisien, intended to resemble a French sidewalk café
. . . (continued)


Image above, Plan of 1st Class Reception Room.
Illustration by Bruce Beveridge

   1st Class accommodations amidships - Aft of the two Parlour Suites were 34 staterooms, of which 24 - twelve on each side - were larger “special staterooms”. These large staterooms were all located against the side of the ship and hence each had two Utley’s sliding windows for light and air. Interconnecting doors were provided between each large stateroom and the ones on either side, thus allowing two or more rooms to be booked in an en suite arrangement. The rooms could be let separately or in any combination of up to ten rooms if occasion arose for doing so. (En suite refers to not only the sharing of common yet private bath and water closet facilities, but also reflects the letting of two or more rooms as a suite.) Each of these staterooms had its own private wardrobe room and access to a private bath room and a private water closet, both of which were shared between two rooms. However, despite being advertised as having “private baths,” passengers booking these larger staterooms were required to pay extra to actually use the bath - otherwise they had to use the public facilities, where the use of one could be booked through a Bath Steward for a designated half-hour time slot . . . (continued)


   Restaurant - Located between the turbine engine casing and the forward 2nd Class companionway was the 1st Class à la carte Restaurant. This was a feature of the Olympic-class ships that proved highly popular, as it gave passengers the freedom to dine at hours of their choice and without being restricted to set courses or fixed menu choices.

   Meals could be obtained at any time between 8:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. at fixed charges, as was shown on the daily bill of fare. Passengers wishing to use the Restaurant were required to apply for the reservation of seats from the Restaurant Manager. If a passenger intended to make an entire trip without taking any meals in the Dining Saloon on D Deck, an allowance of £3 per adult was made on fares under £35, and £5 per adult on fares of £35 and upwards. This reduction in fare could only be granted when the passenger announced his intention to book without meals - that is, to make use of the Restaurant exclusively, instead of the Dining Saloon - at the time of purchasing his ticket
. . . (continued)


   Docking Bridge - The most prominent feature of the Poop Deck was the Docking Bridge. This was an elevated platform over the Poop Deck, running athwartships between frames 142A and 146A and spanning the entire width of the deck. It was used for docking purposes as its name indicates. The outboard ends extended over the sides of the hull by several feet to permit a view forward along the sides of the ship near the stern, and also to allow those on the docking bridge to see the area beneath the counter in the vicinity of the propellers. Because the ship’s beam narrowed from aft of amidships to the stern, the area abaft the superstructure could not be seen from the Navigating Bridge. The need for a docking bridge had to do with the ship’s great length; this feature was frequently dispensed with in smaller liners.

   To communicate with the Navigating Bridge forward, the Docking Bridge was equipped with an engine-order telegraph and a docking/steering telegraph. There was also an emergency helm at this location, being connected directly to the steering engines on the deck below
. . . (continued)


Other topics in this chapter include:
Smoke Ro1st Class accommodations forward - 1st Class entrance - Restaurant reception room and after 1st Class staircase - Restaurant - Café Parisien - Galley and Pantry - 2nd Class accommodations - 2nd Class entrances and staircases - 2nd Class Smoke Room - 2nd Class promenade - Forecastle Deck - Poop Deck - plus Dimensions and Specifications

Copyright © 2007 Beveridge, Hall, Andrews, Klistorner and Braunschweiger.

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