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Updated: Nov. 24th, 2007

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Passengers are seen descending the 1st Class grand staircase. Daniel Klistorner collection.

Passengers on the Grand Staircase - In this image taken aboard Olympic later in her career, passengers are seen descending the 1st Class grand staircase. Daniel Klistorner collection

1st Class Smoke Room. Daniel Klistorner collection.

1st Class Smoke Room on Olympic - In this image from the 1920s, passengers are being served in Olympic’s 1st Class Smoke Room.
Daniel Klistorner collection

1st Class Lounge fireplace. Daniel Klistorner collection.

This image from an advertising brochure published later in Olympic’s career shows women sitting in front of the 1st Class Lounge fireplace. The fireplace in this room was electric; the “smoke” seen in this image was drawn in. Daniel Klistorner collection

Plan of Verandah and Palm Courts. Illustration by Bruce Beveridge.

   Outside deck area - For service to passengers on deck, a large Lounge and Deck Pantry was conveniently located aft of the No. 3 Funnel casing, accessed from doors in the alcoves abaft the casing. Directly off these alcoves were also three Cloak Rooms, two on the starboard side and one on the port side. The two forward Cloak Rooms were adjacent to crew stairwells leading to the Boat Deck. The port side Cloak Room is clearly marked as such on the original builder’s plans, but the one on the starboard side aft is identified as a Darkroom for photographers in both the builder’s plans and in very early versions of Olympic’s general arrangement plans. As none of Titanic’s plans ever carried this notation, and no record of this facility exists as having been fitted aboard the completed Olympic, this feature is rarely, if ever, noted in any histories of the Olympic-class liners . . . (continued)


Image above, Plan of Verandah and Palm Courts.
Illustration by Bruce Beveridge

   1st Class accommodations - All the forward 1st Class staterooms were paneled with the simple long panels enameled in white that were so common throughout the ship, and the floors were laid with carpet. The accommodations area of A Deck was largely devoted to single-berth staterooms, with only a handful being fitted for three occupants. While modestly sized, they were very comfortable and pleasing to passengers, such as Lady Duff-Gordon (occupying A 20) who fondly remembered “my pretty little cabin, with its electric heater and pink curtains, delighted me, so that it was a pleasure to go to bed.” Staterooms A 1 and A 2 were the smallest on this deck, but were provided with all the essential comforts. Each was fitted with a brass bed 2'-6" wide, enameled white, and accented with a few unenameled brass highlights. Above was fitted a luggage rack 4'-2" wide with a mahogany frame and lattice-wire panels, with the fronts made to hinge forward so as to allow easy stowage of articles. Each stateroom was also provided with a veined marble-top washbasin cabinet . . . (continued)


   Forward 1st Class Entrance - Among the luxurious public spaces throughout the 1st Class areas, the grand staircase located inside the 1st Class Entrance hall was one of the showpieces aboard Titanic and is perhaps the most well-known area of the ship’s interior. Located between the Nos. 1 and 2 Funnels, the staircase penetrated the ship for 57 feet from A Deck down to F Deck. The uppermost entrances on the Boat and A Decks were elegantly drawn together by the huge glass dome, the well-known clock panel and the staircase itself. Access to A Deck from the Boat Deck was gained by descending six steps to the half-landing of the staircase, and then turning aft to descend a further eleven steps to A Deck, the stairs below the half-landing fanning out as they descended into the Entrance hall. The staircase itself was 20 feet wide overall. The A Deck landing extended 17 feet aft of the carved and paneled bulkhead from where it originated, with the bottom tread 18'-9" wide. At the foot of the stairs was a carved rectangular oak pedestal supporting a bronze cherub holding up a torch candelabrum. The cherub’s face was slightly tilted down and to its right, holding the torch above its head to the left . . . (continued)


   1st Class Verandah and Palm Courts - Immediately abaft the 1st Class Smoking Room on both sides of the ship were the Verandah and Palm Courts, where light refreshments were served during opening hours. Light and airy, with a trellised decor and cane furniture, these cafés were suggestive of an outdoor gazebo as might be found on an English country estate. Unusually large windows admitted light and permitted views of the sea, and large double sliding doors aft could be left open in moderate weather to enhance the outdoor feel. The port-side café was considered the smoking side and was often found on the Olympic to be overcrowded, while the starboard one was non-smoking and was apparently frequently deserted. Passengers aboard Titanic remembered that this room was popular with mothers and children and was commonly used as a children’s play area. The double sliding doors in the after bulkhead of each Verandah opened directly onto the outdoor area of the promenade aft. The door openings were 8'-4" wide by 8'-9" high; however, when the doors were slid back, there was only a maximum clear opening 4'-8" wide. The doors were of the same design as the large windows for these rooms, and gave the impression of sitting in the open . . . (continued)


Other topics in this chapter include:
1st Class Reading and Writing Room - 1st Class Lounge - After 1st Class entrance - 1st Class Smoke Room - plus Dimensions and Specifications

Copyright © 2007 Beveridge, Hall, Andrews, Klistorner and Braunschweiger.

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