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Updated: Nov. 24th, 2007

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Decanter, Glass and Fork. Author’s collection.

Decanter, Glass and Fork - A glass probably used for serving port wine or liqueurs, a decanter by Stuart Crystal, and a 1st Class fork of the fluted handle design.
Author’s collection

Cooks at Range. White Star Line promotional film / Author’s collection.

Cooks at Range - Cooks attend to pots at one of Olympic’s ranges. To the right can be seen a bain-marie. White Star Line promotional film / Author’s collection

Advertisement for C. G. Hibbert & Co. Ray Lepien collection.

Advertisement for C. G. Hibbert & Co. - This rare postcard, an advertisement for C. G. Hibbert & Co., Southampton and London, shows beer waiting to be loaded aboard Titanic.
Ray Lepien collection

Advertisement for Henry Wilson & Co., Ltd. The Shipbuilder / Author’s collection.

   Introduction - The galleys on large ocean liners were typically designed to accommodate the best in culinary appliances, cumulatively providing for a passenger and crew capacity of around 3,000, requiring in turn some 6,000 to 10,000 meals a day, many of which consisted of at least four courses. The combined 1st and 2nd Class Galley on Titanic was divided into sections with each one specialized for the preparation of a particular type of food. Pastry Cooks turned out nothing but pies and tarts; another set of cooks looked after the poultry, another attended to fish, another to the entrées, another to the joints, another to the sauces and gravies, and another to soup - all in prodigious quantities. Not only were everyday meals routinely prepared - if one could call lamb, roast duckling and sirloin of beef “everyday meals” - but so was special holiday fare such as Christmas pudding if the voyage encompassed December 25 at sea. This might require one ton of pudding, and perhaps half a ton of mincemeat for the mince pies which would be cooked on board . . . (continued)

Image above, Advertisement for Henry Wilson & Co., Ltd. The Shipbuilder / Author’s collection

   Service of plate - The pattern of Titanic’s china differed depending on the accommodation in which it was used. With three separate Dining Saloons for 1st, 2nd and 3rd Class passengers, plus the à la carte Restaurant and various cafés, this gives a wide range of china patterns overall. In addition, it is quite likely that the china used for deck service, stateroom service and in the various lounge and smoke room pantries were of different patterns again.

  The china used in the 1st Class Dining Saloon had an elegant and intricate border of brown and turquoise. The design varied slightly between the larger and smaller pieces, and each piece bore the logo of the White Star Line in the center. This pattern is frequently referred to by some collectors as the “Wisteria” pattern, the name taken from the climbing vine of the same name that was intertwined in the design. The name “Wisteria,” however, is an unofficial designation and is actually incorrect, as that name was used for an entirely different pattern made by Wm. Brownfield & Sons that was not used on the Olympic-class ships
. . . (continued)


   Food and stores - Given the vast quantities of stores that were needed on every voyage, orders would need to be placed well in advance, and would begin arriving at dockside far in advance of the next sailing date. This assemblage of stores was considerable. Foods were ordered from many parts of the globe: choice fruits from California, cheeses from Europe, oysters from Baltimore, ice cream from New York, coffee from Brazil, teas from India, mutton from Berkshire Downs, etc. The White Star Line also contracted store merchants such as Grey & Co. to provide other food supplies. The average consumption of stores for Olympic, enumerated in the following particulars, were supplied by the White Star line and may be considered as a fair average of what the company had to provide every time she left Southampton:
Fresh meats, 75,000 lbs.; fresh fish, 11,000 lb; salt and dried fish, 4,000 lbs.; bacon and ham, 7,500 lbs.; poultry and game, 8,000 head; fresh butter, 6,000 lbs.; fresh eggs, 40,000
. . . (continued)


   1st Class Dining Saloon - Titanic’s 1st Class Dining Saloon on D Deck could seat 554 persons at one time, with one server usually assigned to every three persons. Between the main Dining Saloon and the à la carte Restaurant, all the 1st Class passengers could normally be accommodated at one sitting. However, assigned sittings at separate times would be done for a specific voyage if the number of passengers required it. The doors opened at 8:00 a.m. for breakfast on the westbound voyage and 8:30 a.m. on the eastbound voyage and continued through until 10:00 a.m. Luncheon began at 1:00 p.m. westbound and at 1:15 p.m. eastbound, lasting through the afternoon. Tea was at 4:00 p.m. and dinner at 7:00 p.m. in either direction. Lights out in the Saloon was at 11:00 p.m. Children were not allowed to dine in 1st Class unless there was room or a full fair was paid for them . . . (continued)


Other topics in this chapter include:
Galleys, pantries and other food preparation areas (including full inventory of all equipment) - Tableware - Passenger dining - 1st class á la carte restaurant - 2nd Class dining saloon - 3rd Class dining saloon

Copyright © 2007 Beveridge, Hall, Andrews, Klistorner and Braunschweiger.

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