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Updated: Nov. 24th, 2007

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Funnel Shrouds. Author’s collection.

Funnel Shrouds - Shackles connected the eyes at the upper ends of the shrouds to eye plates which were riveted to a circumferential band located 18 feet below the top of each funnel. Author’s collection

White Star Line house flag. Author’s collection.

Mainmast - Olympic’s mainmast, seen here sporting the White Star Line house flag. Author’s collection

Painting Funnels. Author’s collection.

Painting Funnels, June 1911 - Olympic’s No. 3 Funnel gets a touch-up in 1911. The painters are using bosun's chairs suspended from gantlines. Author’s collection

Longitudinal Section Through Nos. 1 & 2 Boiler Casing. The Shipbuilder / Author’s collection

   Masts - Titanic was rigged with two pole masts spaced about 600 feet apart. These masts were made of steel, except for a 15-foot teak section at the top of each mast. The tops of the masts stood approximately 205 feet above the maximum load line, a height necessary to accommodate the Marconi aerial wires. This ensured that at its lowest point, the aerial would be at least 35 feet above the top of the funnels and away from constant contact with the corrosive funnel gases. Unlike the masts in sailing vessels whose primary purpose was to carry sail, the primary purpose of Titanic’s masts was to provide support for a derrick and rigging for cargo handling, and secondarily, to carry the Marconi aerial aloft.

   Titanic’s masts, like those on most passenger liners of the period, were a departure from the masts on sailing vessels which were commonly constructed as distinct, independent sections termed lower masts, topmasts and upper topmasts. In the case of the Olympic-class ships, however, the lower masts and topmasts were made in one single section
. . . (continued)


Image above, Longitudinal Section Through Nos. 1 & 2 Boiler Casing - A section showing the lower portion of the No. 3 Funnel. In this view, the upper portion of the uptakes for Nos. 1 and 2 Boiler Rooms is shown coming together beneath the funnel. Part of the support structure beneath the funnel is visible, transmitting the weight of this structure to the deck beams on the Middle Deck (F) as well as to the bottom structure through WTB J. Ladders and platforms within the fidley trunks are shown, as are the doors leading from the boiler rooms into the working crew passageway on the Upper Deck (E).
The Shipbuilder / Author’s collection


   Funnels - The No. 4 Funnel acted as a ventilator for the exhaust of air from the galleys on D Deck, the 1st Class Smoke Room, the B Deck la carte Restaurant, the various pantries, the Turbine Engine Room, the 1st Class Smoke Room fireplace, the hospitals on D Deck, numerous lavatories and other accommodations. The ventilating fans that fed into the No. 4 Funnel were located in the fan room forward of the turbine engine casing on the Boat Deck, and within the funnel itself. At two places in its height the funnel was partially plated across horizontally to prevent rain from falling into the space below. Gutters directed the water to a drain leading to the deck outside.

   The four funnels were painted in the standard “White Star Buff” color with black toppings. The black paint was to hide the residue that came with coal-fired furnaces. Each funnel had an elliptical cross section that measured 24'-6" x 19' externally, with an aft rake of 2 inches per foot, or about 80. Their average height above the level of the furnace bars (firebars) was 150 feet
. . . (continued)


   Rigging - Galvanized steel wire rope, abbreviated “GSWR” on rigging plans, was used for all stays and shrouds. Wire rope was immensely strong compared to manila or hemp, and provided far greater strength while permitting a significant reduction in diameter. At one time all ropes were made of natural (plant) fiber which was teased out and spun into suitable form by hand or machine. Natural-fiber rope includes hemp, manila, coir and sisal, but since the introduction of iron and particularly mild steel in shipbuilding, rope made of this latter material rapidly superseded all others, even for lines that have to run through pulleys or around winch drums. Steel, when drawn into wire, can be twisted into rope identical in appearance to rope made of natural fibers, albeit with far greater strength and durability. Wire ropes were made in various lengths; other ropes were generally made in lengths of about 112 fathoms . . . (continued)


Other topics in this chapter: Foremast - Mainmast - Lightning conductors

Copyright 2007 Beveridge, Hall, Andrews, Klistorner and Braunschweiger.

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