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Updated: Nov. 24th, 2007

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Daniel Klistorner collection

Navigating Bridge on Olympic - Olympic’s Navigating Bridge, seen early in her career. The roof is painted white here and there appears to be a covering board or canvas ducking in place. In any case, it is clearly not bare tongue-and-groove planking alone as some researchers had believed. Daniel Klistorner collection

H&W / Author’s collection

Expansion Joint on Boat Deck - The after expansion joint on Olympic’s Boat Deck, photographed during construction. The brass covering plate is plainly visible. H&W / Author’s collection

Expansion Joints - Various Sectional Details - Illustration by Bruce Beveridge based on original H & W Expansion Joint plan.

   Steel deckhouses - The midship structures of the Boat, A and B Decks were all considered deckhouses. The structure on B Deck from the forward Well Deck to the after Well Deck was called the “B Deckhouse;” the passenger accommodation on A Deck occupied the “A Deckhouse.” This deckhouse enclosed the complete internal area surrounded by the promenade, but excluded the same. The Boat Deck contained deckhouses divided by open space. These deckhouses were framed and sheathed with steel, with the exception of specific areas where wood was required. The majority of the steel deckhouses were built before Titanic was launched from her construction berth. Some of the deckhouses on the Boat Deck, however, could not be erected until after the machinery was shipped. These deckhouses remained only partially completed until after the ship was moved to the Fitting-Out Wharf and the engines, boilers, and other machinery had been hoisted aboard and lowered into the ship. In addition, the wooden deckhouses were not constructed until the ship was at the Fitting-Out Wharf . . . (continued)


Image above, Expansion Joints - Various Sectional Details -
Illustration by Bruce Beveridge based on original H & W Expansion Joint plan.

   Expansion joints - The expansion joints of Titanic can be likened to the expansion joints used in large highway and motorway bridges today. Though different in construction, they serve the same purpose - to compensate for shifting of the connecting structures when under straining forces. (The principal straining forces alluded to here - “hogging,” “sagging,” “racking” and “torsional stresses” - are individually defined in the glossary.)
Titanic
was fitted with two expansion joints, one at frame 49F and one at frame 28A. As stated previously, the decks comprising the superstructure were not designed to be integral to the structure of the hull, B Deck being the uppermost portion of the hull girder. The expansion joints started within the deckhouse bulkheads immediately above the B Deck level and effectively subdivided the superstructure into three separate entities . . . (continued)
   On the Boat and A Decks, beneath each of the expansion joints a leather strip having a thickness of ? inch and covering an area of 9 inches wide was mounted the underside of the deck. Each of these leather strips was held firmly in place beneath along the forward and after edged of the joint it covered by 1? x ?? galvanized-iron strips running the entire length of the joint, fastened at 4-inch intervals with 5/16? diameter screws. The leather strip was made to be
. . . (continued)


   Navigating Bridge shelter - The Wheelhouse and the Navigating Bridge shelter were unique because, unlike all of the other deckhouses on the ship, these structures were built entirely of wood. Wood construction was most suitable in the vicinity of the compasses as steel had a magnetic attraction on the needle; hence, it was general practice to avoid placing any steelwork within a 10-foot radius of the compass. All metal fittings and fasteners were of brass or bronze due to their non-magnetic properties.
The Wheelhouse and the Navigating Bridge shelter were made of heavy timber frameworks with lighter secondary framing to fill in the spaces. The primary framing was composed of stout wooden coaming pieces which were bolted to the steel deck. Vertical “standards” were stepped upon the coamings at regular intervals
. . . (continued)

Copyright 2007 Beveridge, Hall, Andrews, Klistorner and Braunschweiger.

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